Category Archives: News

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INDIEFLIX CEO Scilla Andreen – Community engagement

Raising Awareness without spreading Fear

By Scilla Andreen – CEO/Co-Founder of INDIEFLIX

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I want to help. I think we all do, we just need a

clear path to follow. But how do we raise awareness to formulate a plan of action without spreading fear?

How do we respond to homelessness, global warming, mass shootings etc.? I feel completely out of my wheelhouse. I’m at a loss of how to approach the situation. It’s just so big. Thank goodness there are amazing organizations working tirelessly to address so many of these issues but I don’t even know how to begin the vetting process to identify which organizations to support.

The steady stream of negative images and overwhelming numbers bombarding us at lightening speed is paralyzing. We live in survival mode. My silver-lining syndrome is greatly challenged.

However…

I think we can start by paying more attention to our immediate community. Let’s figure out how to really be there for each other. Let’s put our phones down and look up into each other’s eyes. We need a closer look and a long term fix.

Technology has got to play key a role. Let’s celebrate the positive and acknowledge, even pay tribute to the incredible and often invisible people who shape our lives. Let’s get to know each other; perhaps we might notice when someone is going off the deep-end. We need to talk to each other and share our stories, the good stuff, the mundane and the tough stuff. We need to listen. Ideas will percolate and maybe, just maybe an actionable plan will emerge.

I think about the work we do at the IndieFlix Foundation. We support stories mostly in the film and VR medium to start conversations that turn into movements. The Foundation works closely with the IndieFlix Corporation to access the globe and as a result the response has been incredible. Students, families and educators share how our work has helped to save lives, transform communities and empower women all over the world. I am proud of this work, our team, our partners and the incredibly talented women and men we work with every day but there’s got to be more we can do? Whatever it is I know for sure we have to do it together.

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My mother used to say, “after me you come first” I used to think she was so selfish but now that I’m the adult, I understand. It’s the same premise as, put your oxygen mask on first and then your child. If we don’t take care of ourselves how can we take care of each other? And if we can’t take care of each other how will we be able to spot when someone is in distress? How can we make the world safer? Perhaps by being the best living, breathing, role models every day; maybe that will create a halo effect. It’s a start.

Sharing thoughts from 38k feet

Scilla will be a featured speaker at the 2016 SEATTLE INTERACTIVE CONFERENCE Oct 18-19, 2016.  This a is ‘Must Attend’ Seattle event for those engaged in the creative, tech and business communities.

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Scilla Andreen, mother, filmmaker, CEO & Co-Founder IndieFlix, Founder IndieFlix Foundation, Executive Producer Empowerment Project, Screenagers, Angst, Speaker SIC16

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SIFF Chief Curator and Festival Director Carl Spence Steps down

 

SEATTLE – October 4, 2016 – SIFF announced today that Carl Spence will begin transitioning out of his role as Chief Curator and Festival Director.  He will continue to serve SIFF in an advisory capacity through Spring 2017.
Spence began his career at SIFF in 1994, helping SIFF co-founders Darryl Macdonald and Dan Ireland grow the Festival to become one of the largest in North America.  For the past 13 years Spence has led the organization’s artistic and educational programs, first as SIFF’s Artistic Director and then more recently as its Chief Curator and Festival Director.  Spence also held curatorial leadership positions at the Palm Springs International Film Festival during this time and also helped launch the Orcas Island Film Festival in 2014.

“When I started at SIFF in 1994 on a three-month contract for the Festival’s 20th anniversary edition, I had no idea that it would turn into a journey of more than two decades,” said Spence.  “I’m so proud of the work we’ve done together, transforming SIFF from a single major annual event into a vibrant year-round arts organization.  I salute my colleagues at SIFF for their unwavering dedication to this aim and most importantly to the thousands of artists involved in the craft of filmmaking along with our film partners who have helped me provide films and experiences to millions of film lovers in Seattle.”

Under Spence’s leadership, SIFF built its flagship film center under the shadow of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle, saved and revived two historic neighborhood cinemas (SIFF Cinema Uptown in Queen Anne and SIFF Cinema Egyptian in Capitol Hill) and supported SIFF’s transition into a major arts and cultural force for all things film. His deep passion and love for film will be his most beloved legacy and lasting gift to the organization and Seattle.

“SIFF’s major expansion has occurred concurrently with Carl curating outstanding film-centered experiences that bring people together to discover extraordinary films from around the world, while also building a world class programming team with a depth and breadth that rivals that of the top festivals in the world,” said Brian LaMacchia, SIFF Board President.  “SIFF’s current success as a year-round film organization is due in large part to Carl’s passion and vision.”

Spence continued, “My career at SIFF has been filled with many exciting opportunities and it’s been a monumental journey to nurture and guide our exponential growth.  But it’s time to start my next story in the arts.  My favorite place in the world will continue to be the back of a completely full theatre as I watch an audience experiencing something awe-inspiring, funny, eye-opening, informative, and entertaining for the very first time.”

SIFF Festival Director of Programming Beth Barrett (Far left) has been appointed Interim Artistic Director. siff-leadership Barrett has worked for SIFF since 2003 and has been responsible for managing all aspects of film programming, the staff of film programmers, and securing films and guests for the Festival.  Barrett has also been instrumental in the programming and management of SIFF Cinema and SIFF’s other year-round programs.  An aficionado of short films, she helped secure SIFF’s status as an Academy Award® qualifying festival in 2008.

Over the past year the SIFF Board has been conducting a search for a new Executive Director, and hopes to announce one shortly.  SIFF is committed to continuing Spence’s progress finding new ways to bring extraordinary films from around the world to SIFF in Greater Seattle and beyond.

 Spence was instrumental in leading SIFF’s transformation from annual film festival to vibrant year-round arts organization

About SIFF
Founded in 1976, SIFF creates experiences that bring people together to discover extraordinary films from around the world with the Seattle International Film Festival, SIFF Cinema, and SIFF Education.  Recognized as one of the top film festivals in North America, the Seattle International Film Festival is the largest, most highly attended film festival in the United States, reaching more than 150,000 annually.  The 25-day festival is renowned for its wide-ranging and eclectic programming, presenting over 450 features, short films, and documentaries from over 80 countries each year.  The 43rd annual Seattle International Film Festival will be held May 18 through June 11, 2017.  SIFF Cinema exhibits premier theatrical engagements, repertory, classic, and revival film showings 365 days a year on five screens at the SIFF Cinema Uptown, SIFF Cinema Egyptian, and SIFF Film Center, reaching more than 175,000 attendees annually.  SIFF Education offers educational programs for all audiences more than 13,000 students and youth in the community with free programs each year.

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LA Diversity Film Festival brings unique stories to screen from global filmmakers.

Film Festivals – Beverly Hills, CA

Media Inc. Magazine recently caught up with one of LA’s newest Film Festival Director’s Hollis McLachlan from the Beverly Hills Four Seasons hotel to share with us her rapidly growing and distinguished endeavor, the Los Angeles Diversity Film Festival.LADFF 1

Founded in 2013, this unique festival showcases films that are produced and directed by filmmakers whose voices authentically reflect marginalized groups in society. “Anyone and everyone who feels as though they’re on the outskirts of what is represented in our mainstream media, we welcome.” McLachlan said.  “When selecting films for our screenings, we look at issues like LGBT, race and religion, women filmmakers and groups that we feel are under-represented and need a bigger voice”.

Their non-profit 501c (3) festival ran three full days this July with plans to grow to five days in the summer of 2017 that could include national satellite events in other cities around the country. “We want to impact communities that might not know much about what or how diversity may look like from a cinematic point of view”, McLachlan added.  “A longer festival and more satellite events will allow filmmakers a much more fair and equitable opportunity on screen and networking with other filmmakers and the media.”LADFF 2

Having spent over ten years in the industry as an actor (currently an active SAG/AFTRA member) and educator, McLachlan’s time working with people has allowed her the skill set to understand the unique perspectives of creatives and connect them with others in the industry that often lead to empowering filmmakers to tell much more diverse and compelling multi-cultural stories.  “When it comes to Women in Film, there clearly is an in balance of female characters in films these days.” she says.  “One of the goals of LADFF is to help change that by bringing more films to screen that accurately and fairly represent our culture at large especially our female audiences world-wide.”

The LADFF accepts films of all genres and lengths including animation while each screener and programmer looks at each film with a very particular critical eye making sure the stories meet the festival commitment to showcase empowering and educational films from these unique groups within our culture.

Visit www.LADFF.com for upcoming 2017 submission dates and also follower her @LADFF and @HollisMcLachlan on Twitter.     

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‘After Alcatraz – Surviving the Escape’ optioned by Seattle based Capestany Films

Written By Jade Kennedy – Associate Editor 

Now after 54 years, one of the most fascinating unsolved US historical mysteries of all time will be returning to the silver screen with an Award Winning screenplay and original story that follows the infamous Escape from Alcatraz by three men on June 11, 1962.Scott and Kevin

Seattle Producer Scott A. Capestany of Capestany Films negotiated earlier this Spring at the 2016 SCRIPTFEST  in Los Angeles, a screenplay option deal with book author Kevin Bruce.  Bruce, whose father J. Campbell Bruce penned the original book “Escape from Alcatraz” that was converted into a movie starring Clint Eastwood in 1979, recently completed his screenplay adaptation and became a 2015 Cannes Film Festival screenplay finalist in competition.

Capestany Films has been gaining much attention with numerous industry insiders over the last few years involving their aggressive campaigns designed to bring new large scale Film/TV productions to the Pacific Northwest.  Capestany has been strategically positioning his companies IP that includes current projects in development and production mirroring the efforts of Washington Filmworks who have been fighting to restructure the current film incentive program.  Currently, the incentive program ranks at the bottom of over 30 States in the union whom offer spectacular and appealing rebates and tax incentives for producers filming in their regions.

At this years 2016 Seattle International Film Festival, Executive Director Amy Lillard accepted an award for Washington Filmworks’ hard work over the years and helping to restore WA State as a premier filming location that could offer better incentives for their filmmakers which in turn positively impact the States local economies.

“It’s always been a cornerstone of Capestany Films to help enhance the number of commercially sound feature films and TV productions that can be filmed in our State without losing high concept global appeal and avoiding big budgets”, Capestany said.   “The digital revolution now allows quality feature films to be made in the $1-5M range that now carry  lucrative box-office revenue potential around the world”, he added.  “We commend the efforts of Washington Filmworks in helping us filmmakers in this regard.  However, WA state lawmakers need to re-examine the colossal positive economic impacts these films and TV productions make in our communities and the contributions they make among the overall economic vitality of the region.” ONE SHEET Revised_Alcatraz_Jpeg

With their new project ‘After Alcatraz – Surviving the Escape’, Capestany and his team plans on bringing  a large portion of the film to a small Pacific Northwest community that will feature a magnificent 1960s production design, theme and one of the most popular prison escape stories of all time to Washington State.  “Having watched Scott work tirelessly over the years, re-opening the Alcatraz mystery – so to speak – and bringing this tale of intrigue and history to the Evergreen State soil could be the kind of film that helps put Washington State back on the map as a prime and economically viable filming destination.”, said local production designer Aaron John III.

The producers did not comment on or speculate if Clint Eastwood would reprise his role of the aged 85 year old escape Frank Morris or speculate the possibilities of Scott Eastwood to play the lead part of the younger Frank Morris in this film.

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HollyShorts Film Festival welcomes Pacific Northwest Alliance!

Award Winning Seattle Filmmakers set to showcase films at the 2016 LA Hollyshorts Film Festival!

Seattle, WA — Media Inc has partnered with Hollyshorts Film Festival as their official press affiliate this year covering the events from the iconic TCL Theater and the Roosevelt Hotel on Hollywood Boulevard Aug 11-20.

HollyShorts Film Festival announced last week the 3rd annual inclusion of  the “WA State Film Showcase” for their line-up of special film short screenings.  Hosted at the iconic Grauman’s  Chinese Theater on Hollywood Boulevard and other LA venues (The Roosevelt Hotel, Harmony Gold Theater, OHM Nighclub, Ignited Spaces, Avenue 17 Studios, 33 Taps and Redbury Hollywood), the 12th annual Hollyshorts Film Festival will be featuring works from 400+Indie Film shorts from around the world during a week long odyssey between Aug 11-20 packed with of screenings, conferences, parties, panels, workshops and special events.  Nearly 3000 films from every continent were submitted this year.

Ben Andrews and David S. Hogan

Ben Andrews and David S. Hogan

Pacific NW production companies Evil Slave (ES), Abundant Productions (AP), Mighty Tripod Productions (MTP), Modern Motion (MM) and Capestany Films (CF) will be featuring works from PNW Filmmakers.    Headlining the showcase will be the World Premier of 2015 Award Winning Hollyshorts screenplay “The Lunchbox Brigade”.  Produced  collectively by Lorraine Montez, Ben Andrews, David S. Hogan, Marissa Fujimoto, Ryan Wagenhauser and Christopher Meuer,  this warm and adventurous coming of age tale featured over WA state with a cast and crew filmed entirely in the Evergreen State.

The Lunchbox Brigade follows a neighborhood squadron of kids that discovers their brother-in-arms, Johnny, has gone to camp for the summer. They determine a rescue is in order, and together they embark on an antic-filled plan to infiltrate enemy territory (aka summer camp) and free their friend. But when their leader, Teddy, discovers that Johnny actually wants to be at camp, he must lead the Lunchbox Brigade in a touching tribute to the loss of one of theirown.Media Inc Roosevelt party banner

Casted by David S. Hogan of Mighty Tripod Productions, the local talent included Kyan Zielinski as Teddy, Forrest Campbell as Bugsy, Malakai James as Logan, Kristoffer Holtan as Clyde, Eden Campbell as Sue and Alex Silva as Johnny.  “I had a great time casting the talent for this great film.  The amount of talent we saw during the auditions was very impressive.  The kids that were ultimately cast are some of the region’s best young performers I’ve seen,” said Hogan.   

Hollyshorts is listed by MovieMaker Magazine as one of the “top 25 festivals worth the entry fee,” HollyShorts awards the winner of the screenplay competition with an automatic entry in the following year’s festival.

Seattle-based producer and filmmaker Ben Andrews, creative director of Evil Slave, recognized an opportunity to create a strong alliance of filmmakers from Seattle, Tacoma and Los Angeles when he met the HollyShorts leadership early in 2014 at SXSW. “It happened pretty quickly,” said Andrews. “I discussed the need to highlight Washington filmmakers and they discussed the need to expand and further their outreach.”

“It’s truly an honor to see our dreams becoming a reality, having our esteemed HollyShorts Screenplay competition winner Kyle Thiele get his short made via our partners Evil Slave, Abundant Productions and Mighty Tripod Productions along with Shoreline Community College’s Filmmaking Department,” said Theo Dumont and Daniel Sol, HollyShorts co-founders. “This alliance truly signifies the new pathway between the Pacific Northwest and Hollywood, a bridge that creates incredible opportunities across the board for filmmakers everywhere and we are delighted to be involved.”

Lorainne Montez

Lorainne Montez

Pacific Northwest producer Scott A. Capestany, Creative Director at Capestany Films, has sponsored and supported this new alliance and movement since its inception. “We are proud sponsors of the HollyShort film festival each year in support of Ben Andrews’ efforts in helping bridge the gap between the L.A. indie film market and our local market,” he said. “His resilient efforts have helped open up new relationships between Puget Sound businesses and Hollywood decision makers that support the growth of our Washington State economy and our vibrant film/TV local industry.”ATP Blue poster_HS laurel

Capestany’s latest film “Across The Pond” starring University of Washington alum and now Hollywood writer/producer/actor PARIS DYLAN, was selected to screen during this years WA Film showcase.  “It was an honor and privilege to have worked with such a great team on this film. Pulp Digital Productions really pulled out all the stops and delivered an impressive film.   Rene (Bourke) really worked hard leading us all for over a year to make this film come to reality,” Dylan said.  “I’m so proud of our amazing team, Pulp Digital Productions, Paris Dylan, and special mention to Capestany Films for their consulting, guidance, and marketing expertise to see this film through to showcased in the worlds entertainment capital of Hollywood at this prestigious Hollyshorts Film Festival.” Said Executive Producer and lead actress Renee Bourke.  Also supporting the 2016 Hollyshorts Alliance are industry leaders Terri Morgan of TCM MODELS and Peter Barnes of  CLATTER & DIN, Inc.Hollyshorts 2016

“I’m honored to be the winner of the 2015 Screenplay competition with HollyShorts and am impressed with the professional caliber of the Pacific Northwest filmmakers producing the short,” said Thiele, writer and director of The LunchBox Brigade.

The 12th Annual HollyShorts Film Festival and Film Conference/Film Market is scheduled for August 11-20, 2016 at the world famous TCL Chinese Theatres.  The WA State Film Showcase will take place August 14, 2016 from 10am-2pm followed by an Abundant Playhouse special screenwriting event.   MEDIA INC MAGAZINE will host a special kickoff event at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel Saturday August 13th from 7-10pm. RSVP HERE.  Visit www.hollyshorts.com for more information. Hollyshorts on Twitter and Instagram

Keep Film in WA

Attendees of the Keep Film in WA campaign launch in Spokane, Bellingham and Seattle listened to Amy Lillard (Filmworks executive director) and Don Jensen (Filmworks board chair) speak about the upcoming legislative session. Photos by Joe Flores.

Attendees of the Keep Film in WA campaign launch in Spokane, Bellingham and Seattle listened to Amy Lillard (Filmworks executive director) and Don Jensen (Filmworks board chair) speak about the upcoming legislative session. All photos by Joe Flores.

The Washington film industry is battling for its future as the 2016 legislative session rolls on.

Flanked by a strong coalition of film industry allies, Washington Filmworks is leading a campaign to fight for the future of production in the state.

Specifically, Filmworks and its “Keep Film in WA” campaign partners are rallying behind House Bill 2542 (HB 2542), which, if signed into law, would increase funding for the production incentive program and extend its sunset date.

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Amy Lillard

Prime sponsored by Representative Marcus Riccelli (D-3), the bill doubles the size of the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program fund to $7 million over two years and increases the fund incrementally until it reaches $10 million by the year 2020. The bill will also extend the sunset date of the program to December 31, 2023.

With its current film incentive fund of just $3.5 million per year, the state has had to turn away millions of dollars in business. In 2015, Washington State lost out on $65 million in economic activity after Washington Filmworks exhausted its fund by March. By increasing the fund’s cap to $7 million, and eventually $10 million, HB 2542 would make Washington more competitive when it comes to drawing production from outside the state.

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Don Jensen

Washington Filmworks urges film industry professionals to help the campaign by signing the Keep Film in WA petition (KeepFilminWA.com) and by contacting their local legislators to not only provide them with facts and data about the incentive program, but to also share their personal stories of why film is important in Washington State.

Additionally, on January 21, Filmworks organized Film Day in Olympia. Over 200 film professionals and supporters from around the state showed up to lobby their legislators in support of the bill. Campaigners were able to organize and execute over 100 meetings with legislators and got great feedback and insight from the attendees who took the meetings.

Following Film Day, on January 22, was the Hearing in front of the House Finance Committee, during which 9 members of the film community testified on behalf of HB 2542. According to Filmworks, a total of 35 people signed in to support the bill that morning—an amazing show of support.

Stay tuned to www.washingtonfilmworks.org as the legislative session progresses to find out what you can do to Keep Film in WA!

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Shokrian Leads the OMPA

By Mary Erickson Associate Editor
Photo by Owen Carey

Janice Shokrian has worked around the film industry for years. Now she’s firmly embedded within the industry as the new head of Oregon’s industry association, the Oregon Media Production Association (OMPA).Janice

After Tom McFadden resigned his post as Executive Director in February 2015, the OMPA has been in the interim hands of Nathaniel Applefield. The OMPA’s Board of Directors conducted a search to find McFadden’s replacement, and selected Shokrian to lead the OMPA in December 2015.

Ever since, Shokrian has been hitting the ground running. She’s traveled around the state, familiarizing herself with the myriad of individuals involved in Oregon’s media industry. Also on the agenda: getting familiar with the SourceOregon Directory and determining how to maximize its impact, particularly with regards to state incentive programs.

“The directory isn’t just a place to have your name. It has a greater purpose. It’s also a show of force for legislators,” Shokrian comments. “This message needs to resonate more fully.”

Shokrian brings a trove of arts management experience, having worked in volunteer management and marketing over the course of her career. She most recently served as the Executive Director of the Portland Actors Conservatory, and she also ran a boutique marketing company for 12 years, working with a Grammy Award-winning musician, an opera singer, and other clients from the nonprofit arts world. “I’ve always wanted to work in the nonprofit world,” says Shokrian. “It’s important that I have a cause and a drive to my work.”

Although she hasn’t been directly involved much in the film industry prior to her appointment with the OMPA, Shokrian is committed to understanding the dynamics within the organization and around the state. “I’m looking at the OMPA from a 30,000 feet viewpoint…this perspective allows me to look at our work from a different vantage point.”

She’s excited to be a champion for the industry and to provide support, especially working within Oregon’s film community. “I feel proud of our state. It’s not pretentious. Everybody stands shoulder-to-shoulder. There’s a real giveback sense in the community.” Shokrian hopes to continue that sense of involvement in the community while building the OMPA’s membership, which currently stands at roughly 800 members. Shokrian will also work with organizations around the state, such as Southern Oregon Film and Media (SOFaM), to ensure that the sense of community is supported and sustained throughout Oregon.

“We represent the whole state, not just Portland,” she says. “We’re Oregon-centric.”

Film Incentive Bill Killed in Washington

In early March, Washington Filmworks announced that House Bill 2542, which would have increased and extended Washington’s Motion Picture Competitiveness Program, did not move forward for a vote in this year’s legislative session, effectively killing the bill.

As written, the bill would have doubled the size of the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program fund to $7 million over two years and increased the fund incrementally until it reached $10 million by the year 2020. The bill would have also extended the sunset date of the program to December 31, 2023.

According to Filmworks, the bill could not overcome political hurdles in Olympia, nor could it overcome the revenue forecast, which indicated another $68 million budget shortfall this year and an even more significant budget shortfall for the next biennium.

Although the outcome for HB 2542 was disheartening for Washington’s production industry, it comes on the heels of a tremendous effort from the community, which organized a Keep Film in WA campaign to inform legislators of the incentive program’s benefits and raise the profile of the industry. In January, the campaign also organized Film Day in Olympia, where over 200 film professionals and supporters from around the state showed up to lobby their legislators in support of the bill.

“The fact of the matter is that everyone that took part in any aspect of the Keep Film in WA campaign did a tremendous job at raising the profile and visibility of the state-wide film industry,” said Filmworks in a statement. “It was a banner year in terms of the amount of support we received from legislators—with 33 sponsors of our bill from both political parties and representing every corner of the state. These figures, along with the feedback we received from legislators and lobbyists alike, demonstrates that we actually were wildly successful, despite not achieving our final goals.”

Washington Filmworks held debriefing sessions in Seattle on March 29 and Spokane on March 31 to discuss the campaign and its many accomplishments. As for the future of the state’s production industry, Filmworks is currently strategizing to determine their next steps in order to ensure that film stays in Washington.

Meanwhile, the film incentive program is not scheduled to sunset until June 30, 2017, so projects will still be able to take advantage of the incentive, and business is continuing as usual for Washington Filmworks. Visit www.washingtonfilmworks.org for more.

Oregon Film Tax Credit Raised Over Two Years

The Librarians star Christian Kane sits down for a one-on-one interview as part of Film Day. Photo courtesy of Nebcat Photography

The Librarians star Christian Kane sits down for a one-on-one interview as part of Film Day. Photo courtesy of Nebcat Photography

Oregon Senate Bill 1507 enjoyed a unanimous victory on February 24, raising the annual cap on the state’s film and video tax credit. Currently at $10 million, the cap will rise to $12 million this year and $14 million in 2017.

Senate Majority Leader Ginny Burdick (D-Portland) commended the impact of the raised cap, noting, “This bill encourages investment in this state by members of this vibrant industry.” Senator Mark Hass (D-Beaverton), who carried the bill on the Senate floor, concurred with Burdick. “It was important to the committee that we protect film and television jobs,” Hass said.

The Oregon Media Production Association (OMPA) rallied its members, along with other representatives from the Oregon media industry, two weeks earlier to attend Industry Day in Salem. This effort drew over 70 volunteers to lobby for increasing the Oregon Production Investment Fund (OPIF). The Capital was abuzz with OMPA members and other industry workers who met with Senators, Representatives and the Speaker of the House.

Salem Industry Day. Photo courtesy of Nebcat Photography

Salem Industry Day. Photo courtesy of Nebcat Photography

Legislators also had the opportunity to visit the Gallery where the Oregon Film Office and OMPA arranged for interactive displays to demonstrate the quality and depth of opportunities available in the industry. Legislators sat down with The Librarians star Christian Kane for a one-on-one interview, and Grimm’s Danny Bruno visited legislators’ offices and conducted impromptu on-camera interviews.

Janice Shokrian, Executive Director of the OMPA, cheered the Senate’s support of the industry. “We are cautiously optimistic as our legislators see the film incentive as a sound return on Oregon’s investment,” she said. “The economic impact has a broad reach that positively impacts many vendors and local businesses.”

Parts of this article are reprinted with permission from OMPA.

Now Hiring: Filmmaker-in-Residence

Steve & Kate’s Camp is looking for a filmmaker-in-residence for the summer.

Here is a brief description of the job:

You will be on set for an approximate 11-week shoot, producing, directing, and maybe even co-starring in videos destined for viral greatness… at least, in the homes of our campers. You are not limited by format or genre. Comedy, action, documentary — you do it all. You have an eye for catching the film-worthy moments of everyday life and want to help inspire our future filmmakers (aka our campers).

Dates: June 20-August 19, 2016 (at both the Seattle and Bellevue locations) with some training before the camp session

The work is full-time for the duration of the season.

Click this link to apply: https://steveandkatescamp.com/jobs/summer-jobs/

Please complete the application under the heading “Summer Jobs” and indicate that you’d like to be the filmmaker.